Beelitz-Heilstätten (III): At the movie set of „A Cure for Wellness“

I watched the mystery thriller A Cure for Wellness recently. The film is about a guy who, after a car accident, wakes up in a mysterious institution with a dark past.

During the movie, some of the places seemed familiar to me. Especially the indoor scenes and some outdoor shots. It was the characteristic look of the buildings and the floor pattern that caught my attention. I looked at some older shots I took at a lost place and did some research that confirmed my assumption. The film was partially shot at the Beelitz Heilstätten, an abandoned sanatorium for lung diseases.

I've already been there two times with go2know, a company offering paid access for exploring lost places near Berlin. I checked the offerings and saw that May is the last chance to go and see that place. After years of decay, those abandoned buildings in Beelitz will be either revitalized or torn down. So I booked one of the last trips to the abandoned Beelitz Heilstätten to see the soon gone film set of A cure for wellness and some debris, painting peeling off the walls and collapsed roofs.

The men's sanatorium in Beelitz

The film was shot inside two of the three main buildings. In one of them, the entry area was freshly painted and so was a part of the hallway and new, but cheap doors, were installed as well as new windows.

Here's a photo of the entrance hall.

 Freshly painted entrance hall at the Beelitz Heilstätten

Freshly painted entrance hall at the Beelitz Heilstätten

Inside, they only painted those areas, that would be visible in the film like here inside the office of the chief of the sanatorium. The ceiling was never shown in the film so film crew just didn't care to renovate it.

 Partially painted room as seen in the film "A Cure for Wellness"

Partially painted room as seen in the film "A Cure for Wellness"

And here's a small room that was also used in the film.

 Small room used in "A Cure for Wellness"

Small room used in "A Cure for Wellness"

Right next to the above room, I found this one. It was probably not used in the film (or someone knocked wildly on that door)

 Room not used in "A Cure for Wellness" :)

Room not used in "A Cure for Wellness" :)

And this is the dining room which is set on fire during the Film. Allegedly the crew did not get the permission to burn down the building. Some say because those buildings are under monument protection and some say because the building is surrounded by a huge forest.

 Dining hall from "A Cure for Wellness"

Dining hall from "A Cure for Wellness"

So they rebuilt the room in the nearby Babelsberger film studio and burned it down there - and along with it an entire studio. You can read about that here (in German).

I took the shot of the hall using the Moment Superfish Lens. That lens is just ideal for photographing such places.

Truly abandoned buildings at the Beelitz Heilstätten

But there’s more than that. Inside the same house are some truly decayed rooms like this one where a part of the roof collapsed.

 Looks a little unstable

Looks a little unstable

The other 6 buildings are similar cool, like the abandoned depot. I guess this is how a roof that will collapse any minute looks like.

 Front row when the roof comes down

Front row when the roof comes down

And finally, here are two more spots. The first one shows the stairs that go down to the dark basement and the second one is a room with the paint peeling off the wall.

 The Basement

The Basement

 Broken door

Broken door

Apps and Gear I used for those photos

For lost places, my favorite camera app is ProCamera using LowLight mode. You can read more about ProCamera Low Light Mode in a special blog post. And of course I mounted my iPhone X to my AmazonBasics Travel Tripod for those low light shots that already survived dozens of lost places including the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Except for a few shots like the one in the dining room, I used the new Moment Wide Lens. Inside the dining room I used the Moment Superfish lens. Check out my review of the new Moment Wide Lens and the review of the Moment Superfish Lens.