Sturdy Remains: The massive Flak Towers in Vienna

We still have 3x2 of those contemporary witnesses from world war II in Vienna. Those are flak towers / command tower pairs that were built between 1942 and 1945 to protect the main (1st) district of Vienna and  the civilian population against air raids.

The lower part of those towers were bunkers and at the top of each tower were several 5 inch flaks to fight enemy planes. Here's the biggest of all towers that you can see in the Augarten park in Vienna.

Sturdy Remains; Flak tower in Augarten park Vienna; (cc) by-nc Chris Feichtner

Sturdy Remains; Flak tower in Augarten park Vienna; (cc) by-nc Chris Feichtner

The walls of this tower are up to 82 feet thick. The walls on the upper three floors and the ceiling are 22 feet thick.

For each flak tower / bunker, there was a command tower near by. Here's the command tower, also in the Augarten park in Vienna. See the shell hit at left side at the top of the command tower?

Command Tower; Augarten Vienna; (cc) by-nc-nd Chris Feichtner

Command Tower; Augarten Vienna; (cc) by-nc-nd Chris Feichtner

Government and various companies had ideas how to use those structures after the war has ended. From tearing them down to blowing them up to museums to modern data centers. Blowing them up was impossible due to the massive size of those towers. The biggest flak tower in the Augarten park has a total weight of 150.000 tons! 

None of those towers are accessible, except for one, which is an aqua terra zoo. If you visit it, take the elevator to the top of the tower and walk down. You'll see the thickness of the walls and learn about the history of the towers. It's simply amazing! The other towers are bricked up.

See the steel ropes around this tower in the middle and at the top? 

Steel Ropes around the flak tower at Augarten; (cc) by-nc Chris Feichtner

Steel Ropes around the flak tower at Augarten; (cc) by-nc Chris Feichtner

Two kids entered the tower in 1946 and caused the remaining ammunition to detonate. That damaged the entire tower and especially the roof. And the 317.000 (!) gallons of dove droppings that accumulated since 1945 in the top of the tower worsened things, causing parts of the top to collapse and to fall into the tower.

Though you can't enter the towers, you can get quite close to the towers in the Augarten and Arenberg Park. In the Augarten you'll find alleys that lead to the towers. That's picturesque in spring/summer and especially in autumn when the laves turn red and yellow.

I took those shots with 645 Pro MK II App [iTunes App Store Link] and edited them with Enlight [iTunes App Store Link]. For the command tower in Augarten (2nd photo, above) I used SKRWT App. Read my review of SKRWT or download it directly from the iTunes App Store to fix perspective correction.